Chemicals and Chemical Products

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Red Sea (Inc.) is a market leader in some of the industries below, through our global infrastructure we can assist with trade in the form of imports and exports of chemical raw materials.

We represent industry leaders in chemical production and deal directly with manufacturers. We have global international links, enabling us to provide a service in the following industries:

Plastics – Coatings – Paint – Agricultural Chemicals – Detergents / Cosmetics – Pharmaceutical – Water Treatment – Construction – Adhesives – Food – Textiles – Tanning – Electroplating

Red Sea also offers the following chemicals:

Sodium laureth sulfate (SLES)

Sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), an accepted contraction (Lauryl + Ether = Laureth) of sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), is an anionic detergent and surfactant found in many personal care products (soaps, shampoos, toothpaste etc.). SLES is an inexpensive and very effective foaming agent.[1] SLES, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS), and sodium pareth sulfate are surfactants that are used in many cosmetic products for their cleaning and emulsifying properties. They behave similarly to soap.

Linear alkylbenzene

Linear alkylbenzene is a family of organic compounds with the formula C6H5CnH2n+1. Typically, n lies between 10 and 16, although generally supplied as a tighter cut, such as C12-C15, C12-C13 and C10-C13, for detergent use. The CnH2n+1 chain is unbranched. They are sometimes called LABs. They are mainly produced as intermediate in the production of surfactants, for use in detergent. Since the 1960s, LABs have emerged as the dominant precursor of biodegradable detergents.

Paraffin Wax

Paraffin wax is a white or colorless soft solid derivable from petroleum, coal or oil shale, that consists of a mixture of hydrocarbon molecules containing between twenty and forty carbon atoms. It is solid at room temperature and begins to melt above approximately 37 °C (99 °F); its boiling point is >370 °C (698 °F). Common applications for paraffin wax include lubrication, electrical insulation, and candles. It is distinct from kerosene, another petroleum product that is sometimes called paraffin.
Paraffin candles are odorless, and bluish-white in color. Paraffin wax was first created in the 1850s, and marked a major advancement in candlemaking technology, as it burned more cleanly and reliably than tallow candles, and was cheaper to produce.
In chemistry, paraffin is used synonymously with alkane, indicating hydrocarbons with the general formula CnH2n+2. The name is derived from Latin parum (“barely”) + affinis, meaning “lacking affinity” or “lacking reactivity”, referring to paraffin’s unreactive nature.